Mallory(2)Mallory Black

Contributor

Mallory Black (Navajo) is a freelance reporter for the Native Health News Alliance. She holds a master of journalism degree from the Medill School at Northwestern University, where she specialized in national security reporting as the inaugural Paul Sagan Graduate Fellow. Mallory reported for the Medill News Service in Chicago and Washington, D.C. and published stories in partnership with The Military Times, UPI and KHON2 News-Honolulu. Prior to Northwestern, she received a bachelor of communication and a minor in peace and justice studies from Utah Valley University. At UVU, she served as the news editor of her college newspaper, The UVU Review. Mallory also studied abroad in Port-au-Prince, Haiti to research humanitarian response and development issues with United Nations agencies and directors of nongovernmental organizations. In the past Mallory also interned with the Salt Lake County Division of Youth Services and with the nonprofit Friends-In-Need Animal Rescue, located near her hometown of Salt Lake City, Utah. Her experiences inspire her to pursue a career in audio reporting. Follow her on Twitter at @mblack47.

Lenzy-Krehbiel-Burton

Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton

Contributor

A citizen of the Cherokee Nation, Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton is a freelance reporter based out of Tulsa, Okla. Her work currently also appears in theNative American Times, the Tahlequah (Okla.) Daily Press, the Tulsa (Okla.) World and the Fort Sill Apache Tribe’s newsletter. She is a 2006 and 2008 graduate of Oklahoma State University, with bachelor’s degrees in journalism and political science and a master’s in international studies. When she is not chasing her husband, Jacob Burton, or their now three-year-old daughter, Krehbiel-Burton volunteers with the Oklahoma Quiz Bowl Alliance and serves on the board of directors for Alpha Pi Omega Sorority, Inc., the country’s oldest and largest Native American Greek-letter organization. She is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, the Society of Environmental Journalists and the Oklahoma Professional Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Travis-ColemanTravis Coleman

Contributor

Travis Coleman is a freelance journalist. He previously covered tribal issues at the Great Falls (Mont.) Tribune and the Sioux City (Iowa) Journal. He is currently attending the University of Montana in the digital filmmaking program.

billgravesBill Graves

Contributor

Bill Graves worked 35 years as a daily newspaper reporter, the last 23 at The Oregonian in Portland, Ore. He left the newspaper in August and is now freelance writing. He has covered just about everything over his career, but most of his reporting has been on education, both public schools and universities, and in more recent years, health care and other social issues.  He wrote a five-part series in 2012 looking at health disparities affecting Native Americans, primarily those living in the Portland metro area. He is co-author of a book on education reform, “Poisoned Apple,” published by St. Martin’s Press in 1996.  Graves grew up in the small town of Port Orchard on the Puget Sound of Washington State. He earned a bachelor’s degree in English at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Wash.; and a master’s in English at Western Washington State University. Graves was among 12 journalists nationwide selected for a 1998-99 Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University. He and his wife, Karin, a dress and jacket designer, live in Beaverton, Ore. They have three adult children.

Deb-at-Capitol-copyDebra Utacia Krol

Contributor

When asked what she covers, Debra Utacia Krol succinctly replies, “Indians.” Krol, award-winning reporter, photojournalist and editor, is well-known throughout Indian Country as a force in Native American journalism who fearlessly ventures into most anything to get to the heart of compelling stories. She also covers local politics, travel, environmental issues and ‘quirky’ stories, the tackier the better.
“I can write anything except play-by-play sports,” says Krol. “I love to dig out stories and find where the bodies are buried — or why Alzheimer’s disease patients are going without care. I can hobnob with senators, tribal councilmen, scientists, medicine people and bums without batting an eye.”
Her commitment to deep reporting and ability to dig golden stories has brought Krol nine Tribal Media Awards, an Arizona Press Club award, several national journalism fellowships and national acclaim.
Krol keeps a precept expressed by one of her cherished mentors, the late Native Peoples publisher Gary Avey, close to heart: “People love to learn, but they hate to be taught.” An enrolled member of the Xolon (Jolon) Salinan Tribe, a Central California Indian tribe, Krol works to entice readers to learn about the cultures, challenges and achievements of Native America in all its diversity while avoiding the tendency to talk down to mainstream audiences.
She parleyed the clips, photo credits and expertise garnered over the lean years into relationships with major publications such as High Country News, the Official Arizona Visitor’s Guide, Winds of Change, Native Peoples, Indian Country Today Media Network, Arizona Highways and America West (now known as U.S. Airways) magazines. She also managed the Fort McDowell Yavapai News for two years.
Krol is a member of the Native American Journalists’ Association, the Society of Environmental Journalists and the Society of Professional Journalists.

ParkerPrincella Parker

Contributor

Princella Parker has extensive experience in all aspects of media production, including research, documentary production, shooting, sound engineer, editing, youth media workshops, and the creation of film websites, educational curriculum and digital learning objects.  She worked as Associate Producer on Standing Bear’s Footsteps, assisting NET Television’s Executive Producer Christine Lesiak with script development, production planning and providing logistical support throughout the production.  She was the principal researcher, acquiring archive photographs and films and clearing rights. To accompany the Standing Bear educational site Parker produced a short film called Bright Eyes, about her admiration for Susan La Flesche Picotte, this broadcasted in 2011.  Parker is a recent graduate with a Master’s Degree in Journalism from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Journalism and Mass Communications where she produced her second documentary for the Native Daughters in-depth reporting course.  The Quiet Power of Danelle Smith, her first Native Daughters documentary broadcast on NET Television in May, 2013. Currently Princella is working on a 60 minute documentary Medicine Woman about the first Native American physician Susan La Flesche and modern female healers. Princella is a member of the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska and a graduate of Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Broadcast Theater.