Press Room

NHNA to host Twitter chat Oct. 30

In recognition of breast cancer awareness month during October, the Native Health News Alliance will host a Twitter chat Thursday, Oct. 30 from 1:30-2:30 p.m. CDT.

The first #NHNAchat will focus on the challenges and experiences with covering breast cancer in Indian Country.

To join the chat, simply log on to your Twitter account and use #NHNAchat to share your experiences.

 

Native Health News Alliance launches website for shared health news in Indian Country

Media Release

For immediate release: April 9, 2014

OMAHA, Neb. — The Native Health News Alliance (NHNA) provides shared news, features and multimedia stories by award-winning Native journalists addressing the health and wellness of American Indian and Alaskan Native communities.

Registered users on the site can download free stories in print, web and audio formats through www.nativehealthnews.com for use in media or health publications at no cost.

In response to the need of health information in Indian Country, NHNA was developed in partnership with the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) as a non-profit news organization covering Indigenous health issues.

“Health policy and advocacy are big topics in Native communities, but they also can be complex and require extensive resources for media organizations,” NAJA President Mary Hudetz (Crow) said. “Through the Native Health News Alliance, NAJA will be able to offer an important news service with strong stories for our member media outlets.”

According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 14.9 percent of the American Indian and Alaskan Native population self-assessed their health as fair or poor in a 2012 national health survey.

Teresa Trumbly Lamsam (Osage), associate professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha, serves as NHNA executive editor.

“Research indicates that news coverage of health and wellness significantly affects the public by framing their perceptions of topics and those perceptions lead to changes in behavior and public policy,” Lamsam said.

NHNA breastfeeding and oral health kiosks feature pre-packaged news and features, critical to disease prevention and overall good health in Native populations. As the news service develops, new topics will be added. Alerts will be sent as additional content becomes available for download.

“Editors and producers can now expand their Native health news content by utilizing NHNA resources for the coverage of shared American Indian health issues,” Lamsam said.

Publishers and producers have the option to use all content to supplement their own reporting or expand the stories with localized coverage. Users may register as a journalist, health organization, or other to download web, print and multimedia stories. There is no cost to register or download content.

Letter to Tribal Media Editors

March 11, 2014

Dear tribal media editor:

The Native Health News Alliance (NHNA), a partnership of the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA), recently launched the www.nativehealthnews.com, a website for shared health news in Indian Country, and we want you to be the first to take advantage of this free online service. We recognize that tribal media staff members often wear multiple hats: reporter, photographer, editor and designer among others and that producing compelling news and features can be challenging for smaller newsrooms. With a staff of former tribal media editors at NHNA, we understand there’s not always enough minutes in the day and or resources to execute in-depth reporting, even when it comes to critical issues involving the health of our Native communities.

“Health policy and advocacy are big topics in Native communities, but they also can be complex and require extensive resources for media organizations,” NAJA President Mary Hudetz said. “Through the Native Health News Alliance, NAJA will be able to offer an important news service with strong stories for our member media outlets.”

NHNA kiosks serve as virtual reporting assistants for tribal media editors and are a primary feature of the website, offering free, pre-packaged news and features on Native health to publishers at no cost. NHNA editors and journalists focus on health news from the ground up, featuring the voices of those most affected and those at the forefront of health and wellness. As a NAJA partner, we know the communities. We get the interviews. We report the news that makes a difference.

Let us be your virtual reporting assistant for the most important and comprehensive news reports about health and wellness for Native Americans. Sign up on the NHNA Registration page as a journalist, health organization, or other to access web, print and multimedia stories about breastfeeding and oral health.

Our services are free to all those who think good journalism has a positive impact in the lives of all of our readers, listeners, and viewers.

Sincerely,

Teresa Trumbly Lamsam, Ph.D., Osage,
NHNA Executive Editor

Rebecca Landsberry, Muscogee (Creek),
NAJA Communications Manager

Download this News Release: NHNA Letter to Tribal Media Editors