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Latest News

  • 2012
Debora Cartagena

This image depicts a close view of the distal tip of an empty syringe revealing the metallic needle with its blue plastic proximal end that attached the needle to the syringe barrel. In the bright red background, though out of focus, you can still make out the universal biohazard symbol. The barrel is calibrated, however, it is not known what the calibrated tic marks represented, as to their measurement.

The syringe and needle is a very efficient method for delivering medications and vaccines into an organism in a parenteral manner, which includes humans as well as animals. Injections can be delivered intravenously, i.e., into a vein, arterially, i.e., into an artery, subcutaneously, i.e., under the surface of the skin, and intramuscularly, i.e, into a muscle.

The high price of HepC

American Indians are more likely than other races and ethnicities to die from hepatitis C, making it one of the most deadly diseases for Native people.
  • arms up for the throwFI

National Native 10K Championship

Runners from all over Indian Country gathered in Albuquerque to run in the National Native 10K Championship, a race that honored Billy Mills, Oglala Lakota.
  • Dental therapists stock

Dental Therapists

The Dental Health Aide Therapist training program wins national award for its innovative approach to providing Alaska Natives with dental care. And the idea is expanding to other states.

Recent Articles

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Benefits of drug drop-offs

The success of drug drop-off events can be measured in more than pounds. Limiting access to expired, unused prescription medications protects the community, and proper disposal leads to better environmental health.
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Getting the journey started

Ariel Earth (Ho-Chunk/Winnebago Nation) misses breastfeeding her children because of the peace, serenity and love the moment of breastfeeding provided between mother and child.
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Wild onions: A Choctaw tradition

Wild onion dinners have become a part of the life that the Choctaws have established in Oklahoma.
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Get moving for diabetes prevention

The Fresno American Indian Health Project is part of a nationwide diabetes intervention for American Indians that began 17 years ago.
  • FI_Waylon Visit

Benefits of online journaling

Over the past 20 years, studies have indicated there may be a link between increased mental and physical health benefits and journaling. Waylon Pahona believes there is a link and he’s not alone.
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Traditional Wellness

Cindy Martin understands the core of wellness for Native peoples. In motivating others to eat well, be active and mindful, she says, it is imperative to understand the teachings of our people to strengthen their intent.
  • FI_Tooth Decay In Navajo Preschoolers

Disease severe for Native children

American Indian and Alaska Native children are particularly vulnerable to one of Indian Country’s most acute diseases: dental caries, also known as severe tooth decay.

Journalists

Mallory(2)Mallory Black

billgravesBill Graves

Deb-at-Capitol-copyDebra Utacia Krol

Lenzy-Krehbiel-BurtonLenzy Krehbiel-Burton

Princella Parker

Casey Riesberg